Easter Sunday is an important event in the Christian calendar. This important day celebrates Jesus Christ rising from the dead, three days after he was executed. Typically Easter Sunday is marked around the world with special church services, music, gatherings, Easter egg hunts and feasting.

Easter Sunday marks Jesus’ resurrection.

The week leading up to Easter Sunday is known as Holy Week.

The Sunday before Easter Sunday is called Palm Sunday and it marks Jesus’ arrival in Jerusalem.

Crowds of people visited the city to greet him, throwing palm branches on the road.

Later in the week, Christians also mark Maundy Thursday which commemorates the Passover meal Jesus and his disciples ate together.

Christians refer to this meal as the Last Supper.

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Why does the date for Easter change each year?

Easter falls on a different day each year because it is determined according to the solar, Gregorian calendar, rather than the lunar calendar.

This means the full moon takes place on different dates each year and therefore so does Easter.

Easter Sunday can take place anytime between late March and late April.

The earliest an Easter Sunday can take place in any year is March 22, while the latest is April 25.

What lockdown-approved Easter Sunday plans can you make?

By the time Easter arrives, all March lockdown easing will have taken place meaning gatherings of up to six people or two households will be allowed in outdoor settings.

This rule applies to public spaces and private gardens.

The stay at home rule will also be lifted, meaning people are entitled to leave their homes for non-essential reasons, meaning you can attend an Easter egg hunt if you desire.

Families must observe social distancing, but the other relaxed rules in England will make it easier for people to see each other over the Easter weekend.

Despite the easing of these rules, the Government is still emphasising that “many restrictions remain in place” and are asking the public to “minimise the number of journeys they make where possible, avoiding travel at the busiest times and routes.”



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