There is a lot to think about when it comes to arranging a funeral, with it no doubt being a difficult time for loved ones. While many may have ideas for the service in mind, some may be surprised at the cost. In fact, the average cost of a funeral in the UK was £3,757 last year, according to the Royal London National Funeral Cost Index 2018. A burial typically costs more than a cremation – with the former having an average price tag of £4,267, while the latter costs £3,247 on average.

Recently, Royal London published their findings on the rise of funeral costs.

The research took a look at the average cost of a funeral in different regions in the UK.

The insurance company’s 2018 report found a widening of the price differences between the highest and lowest cost locations for a funeral.

While the least expensive and most expensive locations stood at £3,500 in the previous year, the research showed it had risen to £4,500.

According to the Royal London report, this “suggests the effects of the funeral cost postcode lottery are becoming more extreme”.

The printing firm A Loving Tribute has created an infographic of some of the findings, highlighting the differences between 40 different locations in England.

The figures suggest the average cost of a funeral in London comes in at £4,838.

Meanwhile, the cost stands at an average of £3,593 in Tyne and Wear.

Those in Surrey could pay on average £4,451 for a funeral, while arrangements in Yorkshire stands at £3,768 on average.

In Bedfordshire, the average cost of a funeral stands at £3,437, while a funeral in Bristol could cost £3,965 on average.

Rob Pryer, director of A Loving Tribute, told Express.co.uk: “With the costs of holding a funeral continuing to rise, it gives the hoster a completely unfair moral dilemma between wanting to give the deceased the send off they deserve and plunging themselves into an eye watering amount of debt.

“We need to remember that the person or people having to organise the funeral will be going through heightened and possibly hysterical emotions, and more support needs to be offered to ease the financial burden.

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